Guided Tours for Adults

Plan a unique experience for your group with an in-person or virtual tour of exhibitions at the Jewish Museum led by Jewish Museum educators. Book an in-person guided tour at a dedicated time to discover the stories behind the works of art on view or a virtual tour to learn about an exhibition online.

Adult Virtual Tour fees for 60 minutes:
- $250 for up to 99 people
- $350 for 100 - 500 people
- For groups over 500, please email schedulingcoordinator@thejm.org for pricing information.

Adult In-Person Tour fees for 60 minutes (maximum 20 people per group):
- $330 tour of Scenes from the Collection
- $350 tour of special exhibitions

University Tour fees for 60 minutes:
-$250 In-person University tours
-$150 Virtual University tours

Guided group tours are available Monday through Friday beginning at 11 am. The Museum recommends scheduling tours at least four weeks in advance.

Self-guided visits (maximum 14 people per group; must split into groups of seven or less):
-$300 Adult groups
-$150 University groups

$400 Adult combination virtual tour and self-guided visit

To schedule a virtual tour for your group, please fill out the Tour Request Form. If you have additional questions, please contact us at schedulingcoordinator@thejm.org or 212.423.3290.

Plan a Visit

Exhibition Tour

New York: 1962 - 1964

VIRTUAL AND IN-PERSON TOURS

Marjorie Strider, Girl with Radish, 1963. Acrylic on laminated pine on Masonite panels, 72 x 60 in. Collection of Ruth and Theodore Baum, New York/Palm Beach, FL

The Jewish Museum’s influential role in the early 1960s New York art scene is the jumping-off point for an exhibition that explores a pivotal three-year period in the history of art and culture in New York City. New York: 1962–1964 examines how artists living in the city responded to their rapidly changing world through more than 150 works of art. The exhibition includes works of art by Diane Arbus, Merce Cunningham, Jim Dine, Melvin Edwards, Jasper Johns, Donald Judd, Yayoi Kusama, Norman Lewis, Roy Lichtenstein, Marisol, Louise Nevelson, Isamu Noguchi, Claes Oldenburg, Robert Rauschenberg, Faith Ringgold, James Rosenquist, Carolee Schneemann, Marjorie Strider, Mark di Suvero, Bob Thompson, and Andy Warhol, among many others and aligns with the years of Alan Solomon’s tenure as the Jewish Museum’s influential director. Solomon organized exhibitions dedicated to what he called the “New Art,” transforming the Jewish Museum into one of the most important cultural hubs in New York.

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Exhibition Tour

Chagall: Love, War, and Exile Tour

VIRTUAL TOURS ONLY

Installation view of the exhibition Chagall: Love, War and Exile. The Jewish Museum, New York. Photo: David Heald.

Chagall: Love, War, and Exile explores a significant but lesser-known period in the artist’s career from the rise of fascism in the 1930s through 1948, years spent in Paris and then in exile to New York. Marc Chagall (1887–1985), one of the foremost modernists of the 20th century, created his unique style by drawing on elements from richly colored folk art motifs, the Russian Christian icon tradition, Cubism, and Surrealism. Beginning with the evocative paintings from his years in France, the exhibition illuminates an artist deeply responsive to the suffering inflicted by war—often expressed with Christian imagery—and to his own personal losses and intimate sorrows. By the late 1940s, Chagall returns to colorful, joy-filled work celebrating love.

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Exhibition Tour

The Hare with Amber Eyes

VIRTUAL TOURS ONLY

Masatoshi (sign.) Recumbent hare with raised forepaw, c. 1880 Ivory, buffalo horn De Waal Family Collection

The Hare with Amber Eyes evokes the story of the Ephrussi family—celebrated in the 2010 memoir and The New York Times bestseller of the same name by Edmund de Waal—and showcases the breadth and depth of their illustrious collection. The exhibition explores the family’s rise to prominence in the first half of the nineteenth century, followed by a focus on the prolific collector and historian of art, Charles Ephrussi, to the inter-war years, and finally, World War II, when the family lost its fortune and collection to Nazi looting. Diller Scofidio + Renfro, working closely with de Waal and the Jewish Museum, has created an interpretive installation that brings together pieces from the Ephrussi’s collections including artworks by Jean-Honoré Fragonard, Berthe Morisot, Claude Monet, Gustave Moreau, and Auguste Renoir. At the exhibition’s centerpiece is the extraordinary collection of Japanese netsuke, miniature carved sculptures of the Edo Period (17th-19th centuries), hidden by a maid from German officials in her mattress during World War II, and later returned to the family after the war. 

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Exhibition Tour

Afterlives: Recovering the Lost Stories of Looted Art

VIRTUAL TOURS ONLY

Henri Matisse Daisies, July 16, 1939 Oil on canvas The Art Institute of Chicago, Gift of Helen Pauling Donnelley in memory of her parents, Mary Fredericka and Edward George Pauling, 1983.206

During World War II, untold numbers of artworks and cultural property were stolen by Nazi forces and, after the war, an estimated one million artworks and 2.5 million books were recovered. This exhibition chronicles the stories of the objects looted from Jewish families during the war including works by such renowned artists such as Marc Chagall, Paul Cézanne, Franz Marc, Henri Matisse, Pablo Picasso, and Camille Pissarro.

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Exhibition Tour

Becoming Jewish: Warhol’s Liz and Marilyn

VIRTUAL TOURS ONLY

Photo: Will Ragozzino

Becoming Jewish: Warhol’s Liz and Marilyn explores Andy Warhol’s fascination with Marilyn Monroe and Elizabeth Taylor and the tabloid world they embodied. The fact that Hollywood’s blonde bombshell and violet-eyed siren were both converted Jews was significant: It signaled a growing popular acceptance of Jewish public figures. Warhol’s portraits, of these two subjects, explore the complex, manufactured nature of identity. 

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Exhibition Tour

Modigliani Unmasked

VIRTUAL TOURS ONLY

Installation view of the exhibition Modigliani Unmasked. September 15, 2017 – February 4, 2018. The Jewish Museum, NY. Photo by: Jason Mandella

This exhibition of Amedeo Modigliani's early drawings—including examples of his striking paintings and majestic sculpture—illuminates the artist's relationship to his own Sephardic Jewish heritage and to the works of art that inspired him.

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Exhibition Tour

Edith Halpert and the Rise of American Art

VIRTUAL TOURS ONLY

Installation view of Edith Halpert and the Rise of American Art. The Jewish Museum, New York. Photo by: Jason Mandella

Learn about the remarkable career of Edith Halpert, the trailblazing art dealer who championed the work of American artists, Stuart Davis, Yasuo Kuniyoshi, Jacob Lawrence, Georgia O'Keeffe, Ben Shahn, and Marsden Hartley.

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Exhibition Tour

Chagall, Lissitzky, Malevich: The Russian Avant-Garde in Vitebsk, 1918-1922

VIRTUAL TOURS ONLY

Installation view of the exhibition Chagall, Lissitzky, Malevich: The Russian Avant-Garde in Vitebsk, 1918-1922, September 14, 2018 - January 6, 2019, The Jewish Museum, NY. Photo by: Jason Mandella

Explore the bold and innovative work of Marc Chagall, El Lissitzky, Kazimir Malevich, and others, produced during a little-known but influential chapter in the history of modernity and the Russian avant-garde.

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Exhibition Tour

Scenes from the Collection

VIRTUAL AND IN-PERSON TOURS

Explore the Jewish Museum’s rotating collection exhibition which features nearly 600 works from antiquities to contemporary art and addresses themes such as cultural identity, memory, immigration, and language.

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Pre-K-12 Groups

School group tours are now being offered both in-person at the Museum or virtually via Zoom. Tours are led by Jewish Museum educators, and are arts-based, interactive, and hands-on. Pre-K—12th grade school, camp, or youth groups may explore current exhibitions or works of art in the Jewish Museum's collection focusing on themes including Materials in Art, Social Justice, Portraiture, and Immigration.

Virtual School Tours:
45-60 minutes: $140 per class

In-Person School Tours:
Participants in this program are required to wear masks while at the Museum.
60 minutes: $140 per class
Gallery tour and gallery activities only

90 minutes: $190 per class
Grades PreK-6 - gallery tour and studio art project
Grades 7-12 - gallery tour including extended discussion and activities

120 minutes: $245 per class
All grades, extended discussion and studio art project

A limited number of free or reduced rate tours are available for NYC public schools; self-contained special education classes can request free tours. Group size for virtual and in-person tours is limited to one class of up to 30 students.

To schedule a tour, please fill out the Tour Request Form. If you have additional questions, please contact us at schoolprograms@thejm.org or 212.423.3270.

Plan a Visit

Exhibition Visit

New York: 1962-1964

Through January 8, 2023
Grades: K-12

Installation view of New York: 1962–1964 at the Jewish Museum, July 22, 2022–January 8, 2023. © Frederick Charles, fcharles.com

Consider how artists such as Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein, Louise Nevelson, and Faith Ringgold responded to New York City and the rapidly changing world of the 1960s. Groups in grades 5-12 may explore works of art created in response to historical events of the period including the civil rights movement. Students in grades K-4 will be introduced to artists and art movements included in the exhibition and make connections to people and places in New York City. 

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English Language Arts

The Art of Maurice Sendak

Virtual tour only
Grades: Pre-K-5

Maurice Sendak (American, 1928 – 2012), final illustration for “and made him king of the wild things” from Where The Wild Things Are, 1963, watercolor on paper. From the Maurice Sendak Collection at the Rosenbach Museum & Library, Philadelphia

Explore the work of renowned children's book author and illustrator, Maurice Sendak—subject of the 2005 Jewish Museum exhibition, Wild Things: The Art of Maurice Sendak. In addition to examining Sendak’s best-known works, Where the Wild Things Are and In the Night Kitchen, students will consider Sendak’s influences from pop culture, his childhood in Brooklyn, and Eastern European folklore. 

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English Language Arts

The Art of Ezra Jack Keats

Virtual tour only
Grades: Pre-K-5

Image from The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats, with special permission from the Ezra Jack Keats Foundation

Examine the colorful illustrations and urban landscapes of Brooklyn-born, award-winning picture book creator Ezra Jack Keats.  Tours focus on visual storytelling, Keats' autobiographical inspirations, as well as his use of color and collage. The Snowy Day and the Art of Ezra Jack Keats was on view at the Jewish Museum from September 9, 2011--January 29, 2012.

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Art: Materials and Process

The Art of Marc Chagall

Virtual tour only
Grades: Pre-K-12

Marc Chagall, "Maternity," 1950s, lithograph on paper.

Discover the dreamlike, symbolic imagery of renowned modern artist Marc Chagall. Students will compare and contrast works of art by Chagall featured in past exhibitions with works of art in the Jewish Museum's collection.

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Exhibition Visit

Scenes from the Collection

Ongoing
Grades: K–12

Nicole Eisenman, Seder, 2010.

Examine highlights from the Museum’s acclaimed collection of nearly 30,000 objects in this innovative exhibition which presents antiquities, ritual objects, and visual art from around the world.  On view this fall are works by Andy Warhol, Alex Katz, and George Segal, alongside paintings, photography, and sculpture by Kehinde Wiley, Deborah Kass, and Nicole Eisenman. Tours may focus on exhibition themes of global cultural connections and shared experiences or on a specific medium or time period.

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Art: Materials and Process

The Art of the Book

In-person tour only
Grades: 3-12

Benjamin Nathansohn, Prayer Hymn for Alexander I, 1818, ink and paint on silk, brocade cover. The Jewish Museum, New York, Gift of Dr. Harry G. Friedman.

In this studio-based workshop, students examine parchments, reed pens, and the natural resources used to produce medieval books. Students view original manuscripts in the galleries, grind natural pigments such as saffron or malachite using a mortar and pestle, and illuminate their own works of art with gold leaf.

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Art: Materials and Process

Art & Social Justice

Grades: 6-12

George Segal, Abraham and Isaac (in Memory of May 4, 1970, Kent State University), 1978, plaster, cloth, rope, metal, and acrylic paint. Gift of the George and Helen Segal Foundation.

Explore ways that artists address social and political issues and even advocate for change through their works of art. Students examine art made in response to historical events and movements; to intolerance; to representations of gender, identity, and race; and to social conventions and customs.

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English Language Arts

Signs and Symbols

Grades: 3-12

Hanukkah Lamp, India, end of the 19th-20th century.

From the six-pointed star to eagles and lions, symbolic imagery can convey personal, cultural, and historic meaning.  Students decode and discuss these powerful symbols as they appear in art, including paintings and ritual objects.

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Art: Materials and Process

Materials in Art

Grades: Pre-K-12

Harriete Estel Berman, Alms Container, 1999.

Students compare works of art in a variety of media and consider the choices artists make. Tours may explore art from ancient to contemporary, from paintings and photographs to sculptures created from lightbulbs and other everyday objects.

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History and Global Studies

Immigration Past and Present

Grades: 3-12

Maurycy Minkowski, After the Pogrom, c. 1910.

Art can offer new perspectives on the experiences of immigrants by focusing on themes such as assimilation and collective identity.  Through close looking and discussion, students reflect upon the personal and communal experience of immigration and make connections between historical movements and contemporary issues.

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History and Global Studies

Remembering the Holocaust

Grades: 6-12

Abshalom Jac Lahav, Anne Frank, 2007.

Students discuss, interpret, and establish connections between the events of World War II and works of art and artifacts related to the Holocaust.

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History and Global Studies

Number the Stars

Grades: 3-5

Michael David, Warsaw, 1980, pigment and wax on Masonite. The Jewish Museum, New York.

Elementary school students reading Lois Lowry’s Number the Stars focus on issues of resistance and hope through an exploration of age-appropriate works on view.

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Ritual and Ceremony

Festivals of Light

Grades: Pre-K-4

Rod Baer, Every December, Hanukkah Lamp, 1995.

Explore the role of light in the Diwali, Hanukkah, Christmas, and Kwanzaa holidays and view the Museum’s spectacular collection of Hanukkah lamps. Groups may request to focus solely on Hanukkah.

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Ritual and Ceremony

Ceremonial Objects

Grades: K-12

Reddish Studio: Naama Steinbock and Idan Friedman, Menorah (Candlesticks United Hanukiyah), Hanukkah Lamp, 2011.

Examine ritual objects and related paintings, exploring how artists merge artistic style with function. Students learn about Jewish culture and ceremonies through an examination of traditional objects. 

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Identity

People and Portraits

Grades: Pre-K-5

Reuven Rubin, Goldfish Vendor, 1928.

Consider how artists depict people, using the gestures, facial expressions, and body language of their subjects to communicate ideas and emotions.  Compare and contrast works in different media to explore how artistic choices impact the viewer’s experience.

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Identity

Art and Identity

Grades: 6-12

Raphael Soyer, Dancing Lesson, 1926.

Students consider personal, collective, and cultural identity through an examination of paintings, sculptures, or photographs. Tours may address issues of assimilation, stereotypes and discrimination, and heritage.

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English Language Arts

Objects Tell Stories

Grades: K-12

Wedding Sofa from North Germany, possibly Danzig (Gdansk, Poland).

Students examine works of art and cultural artifacts in the Jewish Museum’s collection as primary sources to learn more about their historical and artistic contexts and the stories they reveal.

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English Language Arts

Writing Through Art

Grades: 3-12

Ken Aptekar, I Hate The Name Kenneth, 1996.

By analyzing works of art, students gain insight into how art can inspire creative writing and how writing can be a powerful means of engaging with the visual world. Tours may focus on poetry, narrative, and language development.

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Archaeology and Ancient Civilizations

Ancient Civilizations

Grades: 7-12

Bottle, Eastern Mediterranean, 2nd-3rd century C.E, free-blown glass.

The past comes alive through a close examination of original artifacts from ancient communities. Students consider pottery, mosaics, and glassware as evidence of societal change and daily life in ancient times.

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Archaeology and Ancient Civilizations

Archaeology

Grades: K-6

Horse Figurine, Israel, 1000-586 B.C.E., clay: hand-formed, incised, and fired. The Jewish Museum, New York, purchase: gift of the Betty and Max Ratner Collection, 1981-223.

Students make connections between past and present, explore artifacts from ancient cultures, and learn about the tools that archaeologists use for excavations.

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Camp Groups

Inspire your students this summer with our tours for camp groups. During these engaging themed visits, campers may dig for treasure in our simulated archaeological dig or explore our current exhibitions and create works of art from familiar, everyday objects.

To schedule a visit for your students or camp group, please fill out the Tour Request Form. If you have additional questions, please contact us at schoolprograms@thejm.org or 212.423.3270.

Plan a Visit

Identity

Picturing People

Grades: Pre-K-12

Reuven Rubin, Goldfish Vendor, 1928, Oil on canvas. The Jewish Museum, New York, Gift of Kitty and Harold J. Ruttenberg.

Learn how body language, facial expressions, gestures, and even clothing convey meaning in portraits. 

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Archaeology and Ancient Civilizations

Digging for Treasures

Grades: K-6

Lamp, second half 3rd-5th century CE, clay: mold-formed, slipped, and fired. The Jewish Museum, New York, Gift of the Betty and Max Ratner Collection.

Discover artifacts from long ago in the Museum’s hands-on, simulated archaeological dig. Examine objects from ancient cultures, and learn about the tools and techniques of archaeologists.

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Art: Materials and Process

From Ordinary to Extraordinary

Grades: Pre-K-12

Matthew McCaslin, Being the Light, 2000, Light bulbs, porcelain light fixtures, metal electrical conduit, switches, and metal receptacle box. Purchase: Contemporary Judaica Acquisitions Committee Fund and Judaica Acquisitions Fund.

Encounter unusual materials and everyday objects used to create amazing works of art. Tours may explore art from ancient to contemporary and from paintings and photographs to sculptures.

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University Groups

The Jewish Museum invites professors and students to engage with our collection and special exhibitions through close looking, guided conversations, and studio workshops. Our university programs aim to provide accessible and flexible formats for incorporating art in the Museum into teaching, learning, and making.

Conversations with Art
University classes may book hour-long visits to our temporary exhibitions or permanent collection, guided by the Museum’s educators and curators. Conversations with Art can be tailored to specific class topics.

Studio Workshops
We offer university studio workshops in tandem with our special exhibitions. Following a guided conversation about art on view in the Museum, students participate in related creative practices by making their own work with a teaching artist in our studio.

Please email universityprograms@thejm.org or call the scheduling coordinator at 212.423.3279 to book a visit for your group.

Installation view of Jack Goldstein × 10,000, The Jewish Museum, New York. Photo: David Andrako.